circular_8

1,126 notes

A lesson we learned on Series One was that we hardly ever have a red herring, in an Agatha Christie way—we never take the viewer up a story cul-de-sac in order to make them think something’s happening when in fact it’s something else. But there’s a big difference there between your red-herring-story-cul-de-sac and actually having a story which takes you in unexpected directions. And I know that’s because Russell feels that very deliberate red herrings somehow make you distrust the show and the storyteller—they feel as if they’re putting a joke over on the viewers rather than taking them on an exciting story journey.
Helen Raynor (Script Editor), Doctor Who: The Inside Story (via popscockleswescanhaves)

(Source: itakemymenlikefinewine, via butterflydm)

Filed under writing doctor who

69,128 notes

agt-sharon:

verysharpteeth:

jenngeek:

doktorfylthe:

Characterization done right.

Steve Rogers in a single gif.

We joke about Steve’s patriotism as his strong suit, but his actual strength was his sense of moral right. His whole philosophy is summed up in the line “I don’t like bullies” in the first movie. Steve loves his country. He loves it enough to be at the front of the line trying to fix what he sees as moral wrong in it.

Steve Rogers stands for what America only tells itself it stands for

agt-sharon:

verysharpteeth:

jenngeek:

doktorfylthe:

Characterization done right.

Steve Rogers in a single gif.

We joke about Steve’s patriotism as his strong suit, but his actual strength was his sense of moral right. His whole philosophy is summed up in the line “I don’t like bullies” in the first movie. Steve loves his country. He loves it enough to be at the front of the line trying to fix what he sees as moral wrong in it.

Steve Rogers stands for what America only tells itself it stands for

(Source: 30secondstocalifornia, via long-gone-blues)

Filed under steve rogers mcu